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Chitown-Angler
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Joined: 01:58am - Jul 3,05
Posts: 2497
Location: south chicago/NWindiana

Post Posted: 08:16pm - Apr 15,18 
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So, you are thinking about upgrading your ride on the water? It can be challenging since there are so many options in the boat marketplace today. But isn’t that part of the fun? One of the most important decisions is to buy new - or used. There is no right or wrong answer – it really depends on what you are looking for in your boating experience. Because we all know that boating is a journey that doesn’t stop at the point of sale.
Here are a few reasons from both sides:
Reasons to Buy New
You don’t have to worry about how the previous owner treated the boat. As you know some people baby their toys, and other ride them hard and put them away wet! Your new boat is coming off the showroom floor directly to you without any scary history.
You will be getting the latest and greatest technology. There have been so many advancements in the boating industry lately – and new boats today have all the bells and whistles.
If something goes wrong, you have a manufacturer and dealer to help you through the issue and get you back on the water.
The dealer can usually arrange for an in-water demo. You learn a lot about a how a boat handles and performs with a sea trial.
Reasons to Buy Used
The ‘D’ word! Depreciation happens quickly with a new boat. Some say that a boat depreciates 25 to 30 percent as soon as it is towed off the dealer’s lot. You get more bang for your buck when you find a boat on the used market.
A used boat comes with added options. Many time the dealer price on new boats do not include the extras like electronics and fishing gear. Finding a used boat with the options you like is a bonus!
Even new boats have kinks to work out. By asking questions you can find out from the owner about each boat’s unique personality.
The internet. There are many forums and web pages dedicated to the boating community. By researching used boats online, you can tap into a wealth of information from folks who have experience with the boat you are considering.
Whatever boat you choose for your next adventure, don’t be afraid. Your next boat is out there, sitting in someone’s back lot - or in a dealer’s showroom – just waiting for you to find her!

Calumet Marine
426 Burnham Ave
Calumet City, IL 60409
708-862-2407
www.calumetmarine.com

special thanks to my buddy the wizard of words for helping me get my thoughts to print !

Read more: http://calumetmarine.proboards.com/thre ... z5CnDsAyiR

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Frank aka honda cat
Master Captain USCG 50ton
Great lakes and In shore salt water
After its all said and done.... ITS ALL ABOUT THE FUN!

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Chitown-Angler
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Joined: 01:58am - Jul 3,05
Posts: 2497
Location: south chicago/NWindiana

Post Posted: 07:23pm - Apr 19,18 
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Looking at a new to you used boat here are a few tips to help you check it out /things to look for and at



Tips for buying a used boat

• First Impressions
Pay attention to your first impressions of overall maintenance. Simple things like dock lines, and fenders can be clues to how much love a boat has been cared for. Here’s a list of other things to watch for.

• Cracks in the fiberglass - above and below the waterline
Small cracks, such as spiderwebs in localized areas, are usually cosmetic. They tend to appear near screws that haven’t been countersunk properly and near handles, gunwales, and windshields. Not a big problem—but they may get worse if not fixed. Cracks longer than 2” long suggest bigger problems underneath. Ask whether the boat’s ever been in a collision and look for signs, such as gelcoat patches, that indicate previous repairs. If in double, get an expert to take a look.

• Inspect for signs of structural damage
Is there flexing or cracking in the hull, transom, and floor? These can point to delamination of plywood, breakdown of fiberglass, or even rot in the stringers. You’ll likely want to walk away if you see these signs.

• Loose seats
The floor may be rotten which is a big fix, or it could simply be that the bolts are loose.
Sitting on the seat back as you drive can strain and loosen bolts.

• Mildew
Do the seats, boat top, or carpet have mildew or mold? Check the storage lockers also. Upholstery and covers can be cleaned or replaced, but extensive mold inside the seats is a bad sign. Also, mold spreads easily, so spores on these surfaces may be in the wooden parts as well. Moldy carpet or ski lockers can mean moisture problems underneath.

• Electronics
Burned-out bulbs or bilge pumps have inexpensive solutions. You can replace these yourself. Multiple devices on the fritz could mean faulty wiring. This also can be fixed relatively easily. However, check to see if labels on the engine have peeled up or if insulation on the wires has melted, signs of engine overheating—and trouble.

• Check the belts
Is the alternator or power-steering belts thin, worn, or cracked?
Belts should be changed every 100 hours. Damaged belts hint at lax care.

• Engine
Does the engine start hard, make excessive noise, vibrate, or smoke? Old gas or too much oil are easily fixed during your first tune-up. However, these symptoms can point to a bigger problem, such as low compression in the cylinders, requiring a costly engine overhaul.

• Fluids
Does the engine oil feel gritty between your fingers? The grit is metal filings, which could indicate serious engine wear. If there’s milky oil in the engine or lower unit, this means water is getting in. It could be as simple as an impeller or gasket, but it will need immediate attention from a qualified mechanic.

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Frank aka honda cat
Master Captain USCG 50ton
Great lakes and In shore salt water
After its all said and done.... ITS ALL ABOUT THE FUN!

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Chitown-Angler
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Joined: 01:58am - Jul 3,05
Posts: 2497
Location: south chicago/NWindiana

Post Posted: 05:28am - Apr 25,18 
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Don’t Forget an Up-Close Trailer Inspection When Buying a Used Boat
So, you found your dream boat and can’t wait to tow it home. Make sure that you give the trailer a good close-up inspection. A good trailer will make your boating experience much more enjoyable – a bad one will be nothing but headaches. A trailer that is not roadworthy could cost you hundreds of dollars in repairs. If possible it's best to inspect a trailer when the boat is not sitting on it. The bunks and frame will be much easier to see. Start by walking around the trailer and looking at these points:
Frame and Fenders - Inspect the trailer frame for rust and peeling paint. You may have to sandblast and repaint problem areas. Fenders shouldn't be loose or rusted. Fenders are often used as a step, make sure they're still strong enough to support your weight.
Weight -The trailer specification label may be missing. To know a spring-axle trailer’s weight capacity, measure the diameter of the axle. An outer diameter (OD) axle tube size of 1.75” is typically rated for about one ton; 2.375” for 3,500 lbs.; and 3” for 5,200-7,000 lbs. – remember to subtract the weight of the trailer from the gross capacity.

Tires - Tire diameter matters – larger is better. After an hour at highway speeds, a 13-inch tire will have spun 10,000 revolutions more than a 15-inch tire, which means more heat, bearing wear and increased chance of problems. Having a good spare tire mounted on the trailer – and the tools to install it – will get you out of a jam on the side of the road.

Trailer Wiring - The connection between the trailer and your tow vehicle should be made through a quick-disconnect plug or connector. All wiring should be properly insulated and secured. Look for wire supports at every 18”. Wiring at bends, flex points, and near moving parts should be inspected for wear.

Lights & Reflectors - At a minimum, each trailer must have working brake lights and turn signals. Most boat trailers should display red side-marker lamps at the rear and amber side-marker lamps or reflectors toward the front. For trailers wider than 80 inches, three red identification lamps are required on the rear crossmember. Extra brake lights mounted up high can increase safety.

Suspension -Check that the suspension is creating at least four inches of clearance at the lowest point of your trailer. Leaf springs will wear out before the frame and may require replacement.

Tires and Bearings - Dry rot ruins most trailer tires before the treads wear out. A dry-rotted tire or one with bulges needs to be replaced. Wheel bearings shouldn't wobble or have excessive play. The good news is that replacing wheel bearings is usually a simple fix.

Brakes: - Brakes are required on most trailers rated to carry more than 3,000 pounds. If the trailer is rated to carry 3,000 pounds or more, your state will specify the type and location of brakes required. You may also be required to have an emergency breakaway cable that activates should the trailer separate from the tow vehicle.

Trailer Coupler - The coupler should have markings on the tongue telling you the ball size and its capacity. Be sure that you have an adequately rated receiver and hitch and a properly sized ball on your tow vehicle for towing the total package. If you see anything that looks unfamiliar make sure it fits with your tow vehicle.

Safety Chains - Check the safety chains to make sure that they're the right length to keep the trailer coupler from dragging on the road. A pin or a padlock that secures through the coupler latch is a good idea.
If you have been boating for a few years, I’m sure you have some stories about how your trailer let you down on the side of the road. By going through this check list, you can save yourself some grief – and make boating more enjoyable.
Calumet Marine
426 Burnham Ave.
Calumet City, IL 60409
www.calumetmarine.com

_________________
Frank aka honda cat
Master Captain USCG 50ton
Great lakes and In shore salt water
After its all said and done.... ITS ALL ABOUT THE FUN!

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Chitown-Angler

Joined: 07:43pm - Nov 21,14
Posts: 632
Location: United States

Post Posted: 12:46pm - Apr 25,18 
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Frank I have a 1990 17' crestliner viking that I bought 12 years ago that is still going strong.You put my kicker back together last year when I couldn't finish the job on my impeller repair.The guy I bought it from was meticulous about maintenance and kept all the records so I was pretty confident about my purchase.When the motor was 24 years old it needed a rebuild done by Dave A. and has run well the past 4 years.A few guys from the site I have fished with noticed I cross my safety chains and I feel that you need to keep the slack out or they could pop too if the trailer gets loose.

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Chitown-Angler
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Joined: 06:49pm - Feb 11,03
Posts: 1038
Location: NW Suburbs boat: '93 Sea Nymph

Post Posted: 05:20pm - Apr 28,18 
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I would add, make sure the seller has the appropriate titles for the boat and trailer (if you are buying used) and save a headache or two later!

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Chitown-Angler

Joined: 07:43pm - Nov 21,14
Posts: 632
Location: United States

Post Posted: 06:58pm - Apr 28,18 
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I had a minor problem with that Shawn,when I went to the currency X to do the title the lady noticed his wife's name was on the title too so she told me to go to the car and have her sign it too LOL.

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