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Chitown-Angler
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Joined: 07:28am - Oct 19,14
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Location: Chicago

Post Posted: 11:16am - Jun 24,17 
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Hey all,

I bought a great 5wt set up from a fellow CTA member a few months ago and I'm hooked. I want to get a bigger set up like a 7 or 8wt that I can use on the lakefront and inland. I fish from shore all year chasing anything that's around.

I'm curious about line set ups and how I should go about it. I was thinking of getting an extra spool for sinking line and a spool for floating. Is there any easier more versatile way about it? What do people usually use when bouncing between tge lakefront and inland spots?

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Chitown-Angler

Joined: 05:36pm - Mar 30,08
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Location: Highland, IN

Post Posted: 12:53pm - Jun 24,17 
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I've got a fast sink tip and a clear intermediate line for my 8wt and 90% of the time I just use weight forward floating lines. I believe a weighted fly or just putting a split shinola on the nose of the fly gets way better action using a floating line. I'm sure someone else will tell you differently. I have used the interchangeable topped lines and I absolutely hated them casting them is like running on a sprained ankle. If I were only going to have one flyrod, I'd say a 5/6 is plenty. The kings just aren't around in numbers anymore and the 5/6 will handle most steelhead and any coho just fine without taking the fun out of bass and gills.

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Chitown-Angler
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Post Posted: 01:51pm - Jun 24,17 
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I also want to fish for pike and other big fish which is why I want a 7 or 8wt. Plus if I ever get into some salt visiting family our friends on the coast.

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Chitown-Angler
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Post Posted: 01:53pm - Jun 24,17 
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southshore wrote:
I've got a fast sink tip and a clear intermediate line for my 8wt and 90% of the time I just use weight forward floating lines. I believe a weighted fly or just putting a split shinola on the nose of the fly gets way better action using a floating line. I'm sure someone else will tell you differently. I have used the interchangeable topped lines and I absolutely hated them casting them is like running on a sprained ankle. If I were only going to have one flyrod, I'd say a 5/6 is plenty. The kings just aren't around in numbers anymore and the 5/6 will handle most steelhead and any coho just fine without taking the fun out of bass and gills.


Can you explain the fast sink tip/clear line set up? Fly fishing is still new to me.

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Chitown-Angler

Joined: 10:11am - Feb 12,03
Posts: 391
Location: Lockport, IL

Post Posted: 06:42pm - Jun 24,17 
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Bronzebacker wrote:
southshore wrote:
I've got a fast sink tip and a clear intermediate line for my 8wt and 90% of the time I just use weight forward floating lines. I believe a weighted fly or just putting a split shinola on the nose of the fly gets way better action using a floating line. I'm sure someone else will tell you differently. I have used the interchangeable topped lines and I absolutely hated them casting them is like running on a sprained ankle. If I were only going to have one flyrod, I'd say a 5/6 is plenty. The kings just aren't around in numbers anymore and the 5/6 will handle most steelhead and any coho just fine without taking the fun out of bass and gills.


Can you explain the fast sink tip/clear line set up? Fly fishing is still new to me.


Sink tips come in different sink rates. They can be as slow as 1 inch/second up to 6-7 inches per second. These are meant to be used in flowing water.

For Lake Michigan, you would want a Full Sink line. Something like a 5-6 inch/sec...


Putting a weight in front of the fly kills the action of the fly. A weightless fly will swim much better and not sink like a stone. There is a time for a "jig" type fly. Two different options.

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Chitown-Angler
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Post Posted: 06:58pm - Jun 26,17 
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Thanks for the input everyone. I ended up biting the bullet and picking up a new set up this weekend.

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Chitown-Angler

Joined: 02:42pm - Aug 13,09
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Post Posted: 03:02am - Jun 27,17 
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By no means am i an expert, but to start i would agree a 5/6 wt with a spare spool will carry you through a season no problem. But then you'll become obsessed and eventually have a reel in every size imangineable and start dreaming about tarpon in the florida keys. But seriously, i stopped using my sinking line at the lake front because it gets down too fast and gets destroyed by the rocks and mussels. I personally fish for smallmouth, so i use a floating line and sinking leader / wet bug in craw or goby pattern. This allows me to drop a fly down into a smallmouth's zone yet stay off the rocks as when you strip the fly comes up and drops back down. Sinking line definitely has its place, and in many places on the lakefront, but ive ruined a few already.
I always say it's better to buy used at first to get acclimated: https://www.ebay.com/sch/Sporting-Goods ... ernchicago

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Post Posted: 07:38pm - Aug 9,17 
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What's everyone's go to line set up for lakefront salmon/trout?

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Chitown-Angler

Joined: 10:11am - Feb 12,03
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Location: Lockport, IL

Post Posted: 10:10pm - Aug 9,17 
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Bronzebacker wrote:
What's everyone's go to line set up for lakefront salmon/trout?

Conventional gear.

Seriously, you have better odds blind casting for Carp than you do getting a King.

Maybe you can get a hookup on a bright Deceiver thrown on a Type V/VI Full Sink line, but that is a true needle in a haystack given the lack of casting distance you have with a fly rod.

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Chitown-Angler

Joined: 10:07am - Mar 26,17
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Location: Antioch, IL

Post Posted: 07:59am - Aug 10,17 
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The Great One wrote:
Bronzebacker wrote:
What's everyone's go to line set up for lakefront salmon/trout?

Conventional gear.

...

Yup.
I LOVE to fish fly whenever I can ( I own an Orvis Helios 2 in 10 weght for muskie, and potentially zombie kings) but flyfishing most of the lakefront for Kings will cut your usual success rate dramatically.
If you want fly action fishing kings it's best to wait until they are zombies in the harbor.
You can target other salmonids that will come in and out of harbors and possibly get into a steelie or brown in and around the harbors, but if you are new to fly fishing for salmonids you will likely be frustrated.
Hit The Driftless for trout.

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Joined: 05:36pm - Mar 30,08
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Location: Highland, IN

Post Posted: 08:52am - Aug 10,17 
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Basic W/F floating I always liked Scientific Anglers lines but Cortland and Rio make good lines too. There's so much marketing BS in flyfishing its mind boggling. One thing to look out for is if the line is geared for certain temperatures. Cold water lines will remain pliable in water below 50*, but can get super soft and not cast for crap when it's hot out. Tropical lines are the opposite, they stay somewhat stiff in warm conditions but are too stiff to cast in cold water. I'd just get on eBay or google fly lines and look for a close out deal on last years latest greatest line. You can get really crazy into lines, but there's always going to be compromises as you get more specialized. In terms of spinning gear a 10 foot salmon rod can cast a mile, but sucks for fishing jigs or anything you want to feel. An ice rod on the other end of the spectrum is a great tool for feeling a perch breathing on your minnow. Since your just getting into fly fishing and want to do a lot of things, just get a quality general purpose tool to start with.

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Location: Chicago

Post Posted: 04:10pm - Aug 10,17 
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Thanks for the input.

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Post Posted: 04:13pm - Aug 10,17 
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southshore wrote:
Basic W/F floating I always liked Scientific Anglers lines but Cortland and Rio make good lines too. There's so much marketing BS in flyfishing its mind boggling. One thing to look out for is if the line is geared for certain temperatures. Cold water lines will remain pliable in water below 50*, but can get super soft and not cast for crap when it's hot out. Tropical lines are the opposite, they stay somewhat stiff in warm conditions but are too stiff to cast in cold water. I'd just get on eBay or google fly lines and look for a close out deal on last years latest greatest line. You can get really crazy into lines, but there's always going to be compromises as you get more specialized. In terms of spinning gear a 10 foot salmon rod can cast a mile, but sucks for fishing jigs or anything you want to feel. An ice rod on the other end of the spectrum is a great tool for feeling a perch breathing on your minnow. Since your just getting into fly fishing and want to do a lot of things, just get a quality general purpose tool to start with.




Do you fish in Chicago often?

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Chitown-Angler

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Location: Highland, IN

Post Posted: 07:40pm - Aug 10,17 
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I fish in Indiana most of the time. I'm at the slips pretty regularly in the winter for perch and occasionally fish the harbors for kings or perch the rest of the year. I fish from shore about half the time. I used to fly fish quite a bit, almost exclusively, but have slowed down on it a lot in the past 7 or 8 years. If I'm fly fishing now it's either warm water bass and panfish, creeks or streams, or really really good fishing on the lake front, usually spring coho down here.

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