Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 


Author
Search for:
Message

Offline
Chitown-Angler

Joined: 11:27am - Apr 13,07
Posts: 103

Post Posted: 09:52pm - Nov 24,10 
Top  
I am thinking about buying a long spinning rod for Lake Michigan salmon fishing. My goal is distance, not accuracy - sending a 3/8 to 1 ounce spoon or crank as far out into the lake as I can. Distance is the goal. I’ve never fished a long rod for salmon, so I need help deciding which one to order. My max price range is about $90.

Right now, I am looking at two 10 foot medium rated rods (Cabelas Fish Eagle GS1004 or Shimano Convergence CVS-L100M2A) or maybe the heavy weight Cabelas Fish Eagle GS1006. From what I hear, these rods tend to have a medium slow or slow action.

Here are my questions.

For casting spoons and cranks from the lake shore (not float fishing or river fishing), what are the advantages and disadvantages of a 10 foot rod compared to a 9 foot or 8.5 foot rod? Will the extra foot or so of length really mean much longer casts? Given the lures I want to cast and the typical lake side salmon, should I go with medium or heavy power? Would a shorter rod with a faster action cast further than a longer rod with slower action?

Thanks for your advice.

 Profile  

Offline
Chitown-Angler

Joined: 10:15am - Jul 12,10
Posts: 132
Location: Hoffman Estates, IL

Post Posted: 07:32am - Nov 25,10 
Top  
A longer rod in general will cast farther than a shorter rod. Currently I just use a Medium/Slow action rod because I feel that a Heavy/Fast action will cause me to try and muscle in the fish too quickly. If you want a good deal on a rod for this purpose, check out this link. http://www.cabelas.com/product/Fishing/ ... 704847.uts I know, this rod is 7', however, I currently use the combo that is the second from the bottom of the page. It's reel holds 200 yards of 10 lb test (the standard for this kind of fishing) and the rod casts pretty far. If you are looking for an amazing deal, this is a great one. Only $54.99.

 Profile  

Offline
Chitown-Angler

Joined: 01:24pm - Feb 6,10
Posts: 26
Location: Geneva, IL

Post Posted: 08:08am - Nov 25,10 
Top  
For the money, another rod that represents good value is an Okuma Guide Select. THey have a GS-S-1062ML that might be what you are looking for.

IN GENERAL, yes a longer rod will cast further, as long as the rod is working somewhat within it's stated weight range. But, having said that, a slow action rod that is way overloaded will lose much distance. Additionally, action ratings can be somewhat relative and there is a wide variation. That's why it's best to handle them.

Another thing that maybe should be considered in this equation is rod weight. If you plan on spending some time casting, certainly a lighter, better balanced rod is much easier on the arm and shoulder than a longer, perhaps heavier and/or more tip heavy rod when you are casting for hours.

Lastly, and you probably know this is that line diameter is a critical determinant of casting distance. That's why braids will way outcast similarly rated mono lines.

 Profile  

Offline
Chitown-Angler
User avatar

Joined: 10:30am - Nov 13,07
Posts: 363
Location: Chicago

Post Posted: 09:05am - Nov 25,10 
Top  
Go with the Shimano- they have a nice warranty and its a great rod for the price. I personally go with a 9'6 ML with the michigan handle. Mik-Muffin has them on sale, I bought mine from them two years ago, broke it this fall and $10.00 got me a new one!. Its one of those rods that I could use for anything- from Blue Gills to Kings.....its sweet. Good luck.

_________________
As a man thinks......so he is.

 Profile  

Offline
Chitown-Angler

Joined: 02:23pm - Nov 16,09
Posts: 76
Location: s.side chi/ind border

Post Posted: 03:44pm - Nov 25,10 
Top  
for casting 10' can be to much esppecially on a mid grade rod
i prefer my 9'6" ml fast act. by lamiglass which i bought brand new for $100.00 on e bay (factory dealer from Washington)
its a great all around pole i've caught around a dozen species in less than a year from perch and gills to northern and kings
but it is a little light if you want to throw 1oz spoons 2/3oz max recommended but i threw 3/4 oz no prob. this fall
best bet would be looking for a good used 8'6" mh st.croix wild river good distance,good action,tough rod

_________________
A COUNTRY BOY CAN SURVIVE!

 Profile  

Offline
Chitown-Angler

Joined: 11:27am - Apr 13,07
Posts: 103

Post Posted: 09:37am - Nov 26,10 
Top  
From what you are saying, a longer rod is good, but a 10-foot rod might not be the best choice for shore casting. It might be too long. So do you think that a 9 or 9' 6" rod is best? And it seems like you think medium light is the way to go. But aren't most salmon casting spoons in the 1/2 oz to 3/4 ounce range, some even heavier. Can a medium-light rod handle those.

Speaking of handle, does handle length matter. Some salmon rods have longer rear grips (for example 14 inches) and others have shorter rear grips (11 inches). Does any prefer the "michigan" style handle, with a long foregrip, what's that for?

Thanks for your advice.

 Profile  

Offline
Chitown-Angler

Joined: 01:24pm - Feb 6,10
Posts: 26
Location: Geneva, IL

Post Posted: 07:20am - Nov 30,10 
Top  
Really, it's all about personal preferences. There are alot of guys out there who sling long rods all day. Back in the day, I used to sling a 12' rod, but then again, my arm and shoulders were nornal strength. You will also see those who use bass length spinning rods. In my mind, it's more about the weight and balance of the whole outfit, as too heavy or unbalanced of a rig will tire someone out fast. I agree getting max distance is important, but also having a rod that is light in hand for 6 to 8 hours of casting or more makes a big difference Depending on the rod, I have no problem with an ML (6-10 or 8-12#) for most spoon slinging duties.

Handle length is a good question. For a dedicated casting rod, and especially a longer rod, a longer handle usually balances the rod better and allows for 2 handed casting. However, having said that, too long of a butt handle gets in the way, even to the point of being too clumsy. As a rule of thumb, grip the rod where you would for casting and lay the butt handle up against the back of your forearm. Ideally it should not extend past your elbow. The more it extends past your elbow, the more it gets in the way in my experience.

 Profile  

Offline
Chitown-Angler

Joined: 11:29pm - Jul 22,10
Posts: 113
Location: Waukegan, IL

Post Posted: 09:03am - Nov 30,10 
Top  
It really is all about personal preference. I don't have experience with a wide variety of rods, but I have found something that I like and works for me. I should also say that I use my salmon casting rod for other applications too...I prefer to have a rod that is very flexible in application. I personally use a 7' Medium action rod. I have a reel, I don't even remember the brand anymore, that I got for Christmas when 11 years ago. My current rod is a Berkeley Lightning rod and is a little stiffer than my last 7' M (it's the one that they market as engineered for Super braid). I can cast all day and night with it. It's very light and has plenty of back bone. One thing that I did recently that gave me a greater casting distance was to switch to a super braid line. I spooled up some 20 lb. PowerPro and I got some extra distance (at least I feel like I did).

So that's my opinion...a lot of people will recommend a longer rod...I like the 7'.

Good luck!

_________________
Actions express priorities.
- Mohandas Gandhi

 Profile  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic Latest Topics  [ 8 posts ] 

Board index » Lake Michigan » Shore Fishing the Big Pond
Jump to:  


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum